www.sefindia.org

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING FORUM OF INDIA [SEFI]

 Forum SubscriptionsSubscriptions DigestDigest Preferences   FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups  RegisterRegister FAQSecurity Tips FAQDonate
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log in to websiteLog in to websiteLog in to websiteLog in to forum 
Warning: Make sure you scan the downloaded attachment with updated antivirus tools  before opening them. They may contain viruses.
Use online scanners
here and here to upload downloaded attachment to check for safety.

Welding Anchor Bolts
Goto page Previous  1, 2
 
Post new topicReply to topic Thank Post    www.sefindia.org Forum Index -> SEFI General Discussion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
ibarua
General Sponsor
General Sponsor


Joined: 26 Jan 2003
Posts: 1039

PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:28 am    Post subject: Welding Anchor Bolts Reply with quote

10th Jan 2009

Don't great minds think alike?

I.B.


On Fri, 09 Jan 2009 jatfuentes wrote :
Quote:
Thanks, Dr. Subramanian, Thanks Mr. Indrajit Barua and
all friends that sent ideas,

It is exactly what a I did. I used a butt weld and a
sleeve welded to the anchor bolt. The pipe (sleeve ) I
used is SAC 50, of better quality than the anchor bolt(
SAE 1020).
In other e-mail I will send the detail of the anchor
bolt splice for future reference.

Regards,
jatfuentes






---------- Cabeçalho original -----------

De: "drnsmani" forum@sefindia.org
Para: general@sefindia.org
Cópia:
Data: Thu, 08 Jan 2009 21:34:02 +0530
Assunto: [SEFI] Re: Welding Anchor Bolts


Quote:
Dear Mr.Jatfuentes,
The following solution suggested by Mr.Indrajit Barua
is the best one for you to adopt, whether the anchor
bolt is in tension or compression.

Quote:

Regards
NS

[Image: http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/tsmil-
eys2/23.gif ]Dr.N.Subramanian,Ph.D.,F.ASCE, M.ACI,
Quote:

Consulting Structural Engineer
Maryland, USA

See my books at: www.multi-science.co.uk/subramanian-b-
ook.htm
(http://www.multi-science.co.uk/subramanian-book.htm)

Quote:
www.oup.co.in/search_detail.php?id=144559
(http://www.oup.co.in/search_detail.php?id=144559)
Quote:





--- On Thu, 1/8/09, ibarua <forum@sefindia.org> wrote:

Quote:
From: ibarua <forum@sefindia.org>
Subject: [SEFI] Re: Welding Anchor Bolts
To: general@sefindia.org
Date: Thursday, January 8, 2009, 10:32 AM

9TH JAN 2009

In case of tensile forces on the bolts, a solution
may be to provide a 'cover' or 'sleeve' over the butt
Quote:
welded joint and then weld the 'sleeve' to the bolt,
taking care not to damage the threads which will hold
the
Quote:
nuts in place. Also, the question of loss of strength
/increase in brittleness of the bolts due to heating
Quote:
during the welding process has to be considered.

Quote:

Indrajit Barua.

On Wed, 07 Jan 2009 drnsmani wrote :
      --auto removed--








Posted via Email
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ibarua
General Sponsor
General Sponsor


Joined: 26 Jan 2003
Posts: 1039

PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:39 am    Post subject: Welding Anchor Bolts Reply with quote

10 Jan 2009

The bolt has necessarily to project beyond the sleeve to accommodate the nut.

I.B.


On Fri, 09 Jan 2009 pravin.pai wrote :
Quote:
Dear Mr Barua:

I did not understand this solution. After he provides
the sleeve over the joint, how can they screw the nut
over it?

regards
ppai



On 1/8/09, ibarua <forum@sefindia.org
(forum@sefindia.org)> wrote:
Quote:
  9TH JAN 2009

In case of tensile forces on the bolts, a solution may
be to provide a 'cover' or 'sleeve' over the butt
welded joint and then weld the 'sleeve' to the bolt,
taking care not to damage the threads which will hold
the nuts in place. Also, the question of loss of
strength /increase in brittleness of the bolts due to
heating during the welding process has to be considered.

Indrajit Barua.

On Wed, 07 Jan 2009 drnsmani wrote :
--auto removed--








Posted via Email
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
vipul_ahuja
SEFI Member
SEFI Member


Joined: 01 Jan 2009
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2009 9:33 am    Post subject: Welding Anchor Bolts Reply with quote

Why can't a simple coupler be used. Chip off some concrete if greater lap is required. If not much room is available for coupler, cut off a little bit of bolt shank to make it available.

If welding is done, it will be hard to align the new welded portion so the nut wont bear properly over the base plate. There is so much notching in the thread root; any bending in the bolt shank will initiate a fracture.

Thanks & regards

Vipul Ahuja
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jatfuentes
...
...


Joined: 26 Jul 2008
Posts: 68

PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2009 11:12 am    Post subject: RES: Re: Welding Anchor Bolts Reply with quote

Thanks Mr. r.anna

I visited the site that you sent.  
I found an interesting article in Internet that I send in attach.
Regards,
jatfuentes

De: ranna [mailto:forum@sefindia.org]
Enviada em: sábado, 10 de janeiro de 2009 04:17
Para: general@sefindia.org
Assunto: [SEFI] Re: Welding Anchor Bolts



the anchor bolt can definitely be welded.
for welding requirement kindly contact
welding research institute
bhel,
trichy 620014
phone 0431 2520266
r.anna
ranna@bheltry.co.in (ranna@bheltry.co.in) (ranna@bheltry.co.in (ranna@bheltry.co.in))

jatfuentes wrote:    
--auto removed--

Posted via Email



Warning: Make sure you scan the downloaded attachment with updated antivirus tools  before opening them. They may contain viruses.
Use online scanners
here and here to upload downloaded attachment to check for safety.
welding-high-strength-anchor-b.pdf
 Description:

Download
 Filename:  welding-high-strength-anchor-b.pdf
 Filesize:  44.32 KB
 Downloaded:  309 Time(s)

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dr. N. Subramanian
General Sponsor
General Sponsor


Joined: 21 Feb 2008
Posts: 5442
Location: Gaithersburg, MD, U.S.A.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2009 12:56 am    Post subject: Welding Anchor Bolts Reply with quote

Dear Mr. Jatfuentes

Is the anchor bolt, referred by you is made of high-strength steel?

High strength steels tend to be more sensitive to cracking than mild steels, which is why implementing good heat control prior to and during the welding process is crucial. First, preheating is a best step toward controlling the temperature gradient, or the range of temperature increase and decrease that occurs during welding. This is especially important, as welding on a cold piece of high strength steel will cause the material to heat up too quickly, and in turn cool too rapidly. This rapid cooling is the leading cause of cracking and preheating helps prevent it.

Likewise, welders need to maintain the correct interpass temperature for a given thickness of high strength steel. Doing so prevents a larger heat affected zone (HAZ) from forming during welding; HAZ is the area between the weld deposit and the base metal and an area that is prone to cracking. Maintaining interpass temperatures also reduces changes to the grain structure of the steel during cooling, which in turn limits any mechanical changes that could adversely affect the steels’ toughness or tensile strength. Welders can use contact pyrometers, Tempilstiks or other heat-sensing devices (including infared) to track the interpass temperature specified for their particular welding procedure.

As with any welding process, controlling travel speed and maintaining the recommended welding parameters (volts, amps) minimizes heat input when welding high strength steels.

Choosing filler metals with the least amount of hydrogen content, as well as those with good toughness (high impact values) and the appropriate strength is key when welding high strength steels. Each of these features also helps prevent cracking.


Carbon equivalant also places an important role in weldability; See pp. 20 of my book on steel structures



Regards

Subramanian








Dr.N.Subramanian,Ph.D.,F.ASCE, M.ACI,

Consulting Structural Engineer
Maryland, USA

See my books at: www.multi-science.co.uk/subramanian-book.htm
www.oup.co.in/search_detail.php?id=144559





--- On Sat, 1/10/09, jatfuentes <forum@sefindia.org> wrote:
Quote:
From: jatfuentes <forum@sefindia.org>
Subject: [SEFI] Re: Welding Anchor Bolts
To: general@sefindia.org
Date: Saturday, January 10, 2009, 4:56 PM

Thanks Mr. r.anna

I visited the site that you sent.
I found an interesting article in Internet that I send in attach.
Regards,
jatfuentes

De: ranna [mailto:forum@sefindia.org]
Enviada em: sábado, 10 de janeiro de 2009 04:17
Para: general@sefindia.org (general@sefindia.org)
Assunto: [SEFI] Re: Welding Anchor Bolts



the anchor bolt can definitely be welded.
for welding requirement kindly contact
welding research institute
bhel,
trichy 620014
phone 0431 2520266
r.anna
ranna@bheltry.co.in (ranna@bheltry.co.in) (ranna@bheltry.co.in (ranna@bheltry.co.in)) (ranna@bheltry.co.in (ranna@bheltry.co.in (ranna@bheltry.co.in)))

jatfuentes wrote:
--auto removed--





Attachments:
welding-high-strength-anchor-b.pdf





Posted via Email
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jatfuentes
...
...


Joined: 26 Jul 2008
Posts: 68

PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2009 11:41 am    Post subject: RES: Re: Welding Anchor Bolts Reply with quote

Dear Dr. Subramanian

The chemical composition of SAE 1020 is : C=0.23, Mn=0.6; P=0.030 and S=0.05
Specifications  don´t say nothing about Cr, Mo, V, Ni and Cu ( I suppose that don’t have this elements).

Applying the formula for  equivalent carbon  Ceq = (C+Mn)/6 + (Cr+Mo+V)/5 +(Ni+Cu)/15   
 I obtain Ceq = 0.138 less than 0.30.
Then I can deduct that this steel have good weldability

This steel SAE 1020 is very common here in Brazil for the design of anchor bolts. Its mechanical properties are Fy = 210 MPa and Fu=380 MPu.

Thanks for your advice.
Sincerely,
jatfuentes

De: drnsmani [mailto:forum@sefindia.org]
Enviada em: sábado, 10 de janeiro de 2009 23:37
Para: general@sefindia.org
Assunto: [SEFI] Re: Welding Anchor Bolts



Dear Mr. Jatfuentes

Is the anchor bolt, referred by you is made of high-strength steel?

High strength steels tend to be more sensitive to cracking than mild steels, which is why implementing good heat control prior to and during the welding process is crucial. First, preheating is a best step toward controlling the temperature gradient, or the range of temperature increase and decrease that occurs during welding. This is especially important, as welding on a cold piece of high strength steel will cause the material to heat up too quickly, and in turn cool too rapidly. This rapid cooling is the leading cause of cracking and preheating helps prevent it.

Likewise, welders need to maintain the correct interpass temperature for a given thickness of high strength steel. Doing so prevents a larger heat affected zone (HAZ) from forming during welding; HAZ is the area between the weld deposit and the base metal and an area that is prone to cracking. Maintaining interpass temperatures also reduces changes to the grain structure of the steel during cooling, which in turn limits any mechanical changes that could adversely affect the steels’ toughness or tensile strength. Welders can use contact pyrometers, Tempilstiks or other heat-sensing devices (including infared) to track the interpass temperature specified for their particular welding procedure.

As with any welding process, controlling travel speed and maintaining the recommended welding parameters (volts, amps) minimizes heat input when welding high strength steels.

Choosing filler metals with the least amount of hydrogen content, as well as those with good toughness (high impact values) and the appropriate strength is key when welding high strength steels. Each of these features also helps prevent cracking.


Carbon equivalant also places an important role in weldability; See pp. 20 of my book on steel structures



Regards

Subramanian








Dr.N.Subramanian,Ph.D.,F.ASCE, M.ACI,

Consulting Structural Engineer
Maryland, USA

See my books at: www.multi-science.co.uk/subramanian-book.htm
www.oup.co.in/search_detail.php?id=144559





--- On Sat, 1/10/09, jatfuentes wrote:    
--auto removed--

Posted via Email
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dr. N. Subramanian
General Sponsor
General Sponsor


Joined: 21 Feb 2008
Posts: 5442
Location: Gaithersburg, MD, U.S.A.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2009 5:54 pm    Post subject: Welding Anchor Bolts Reply with quote

Dear Mr. Jatfuentes

Since Fy is only 210 MPa, and since Ceq is only 0.138, you can weld it.

Best wishes
Subramanian

Dr.N.Subramanian,Ph.D.,F.ASCE, M.ACI,

Consulting Structural Engineer
Maryland, USA

See my books at: www.multi-science.co.uk/subramanian-book.htm
www.oup.co.in/search_detail.php?id=144559





--- On Sun, 1/11/09, jatfuentes <forum@sefindia.org> wrote:
Quote:
From: jatfuentes <forum@sefindia.org>
Subject: [SEFI] Re: Welding Anchor Bolts
To: general@sefindia.org
Date: Sunday, January 11, 2009, 8:34 PM

Dear Dr. Subramanian

The chemical composition of SAE 1020 is : C=0.23, Mn=0.6; P=0.030 and S=0.05
Specifications don´t say nothing about Cr, Mo, V, Ni and Cu ( I suppose that don’t have this elements).

Applying the formula for equivalent carbon Ceq = (C+Mn)/6 + (Cr+Mo+V)/5 +(Ni+Cu)/15
I obtain Ceq = 0.138 less than 0.30.
Then I can deduct that this steel have good weldability

This steel SAE 1020 is very common here in Brazil for the design of anchor bolts. Its mechanical properties are Fy = 210 MPa and Fu=380 MPu.

Thanks for your advice.
Sincerely,
jatfuentes

De: drnsmani [mailto:forum@sefindia.org]
Enviada em: sábado, 10 de janeiro de 2009 23:37
Para: general@sefindia.org (general@sefindia.org)
Assunto: [SEFI] Re: Welding Anchor Bolts



Dear Mr. Jatfuentes

Is the anchor bolt, referred by you is made of high-strength steel?

High strength steels tend to be more sensitive to cracking than mild steels, which is why implementing good heat control prior to and during the welding process is crucial. First, preheating is a best step toward controlling the temperature gradient, or the range of temperature increase and decrease that occurs during welding. This is especially important, as welding on a cold piece of high strength steel will cause the material to heat up too quickly, and in turn cool too rapidly. This rapid cooling is the leading cause of cracking and preheating helps prevent it.

Likewise, welders need to maintain the correct interpass temperature for a given thickness of high strength steel. Doing so prevents a larger heat affected zone (HAZ) from forming during welding; HAZ is the area between the weld deposit and the base metal and an area that is prone to cracking. Maintaining interpass temperatures also reduces changes to the grain structure of the steel during cooling, which in turn limits any mechanical changes that could adversely affect the steels’ toughness or tensile strength. Welders can use contact pyrometers, Tempilstiks or other heat-sensing devices (including infared) to track the interpass temperature specified for their particular welding procedure.

As with any welding process, controlling travel speed and maintaining the recommended welding parameters (volts, amps) minimizes heat input when welding high strength steels.

Choosing filler metals with the least amount of hydrogen content, as well as those with good toughness (high impact values) and the appropriate strength is key when welding high strength steels. Each of these features also helps prevent cracking.


Carbon equivalant also places an important role in weldability; See pp. 20 of my book on steel structures



Regards

Subramanian








Dr.N.Subramanian,Ph.D.,F.ASCE, M.ACI,

Consulting Structural Engineer
Maryland, USA

See my books at: www.multi-science.co.uk/subramanian-book.htm
www.oup.co.in/search_detail.php?id=144559





--- On Sat, 1/10/09, jatfuentes wrote:
--auto removed--
     



     



Posted via Email
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jatfuentes
...
...


Joined: 26 Jul 2008
Posts: 68

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 8:39 am    Post subject: RES: Re: Welding Anchor Bolts Reply with quote

Thank you for your reply Dr. Subramanian,
Regards,
jatfuentes

De: drnsmani [mailto:forum@sefindia.org]
Enviada em: domingo, 11 de janeiro de 2009 18:38
Para: general@sefindia.org
Assunto: [SEFI] Re: Welding Anchor Bolts



Dear Mr. Jatfuentes

Since Fy is only 210 MPa, and since Ceq is only 0.138, you can weld it.

Best wishes
Subramanian

Dr.N.Subramanian,Ph.D.,F.ASCE, M.ACI,

Consulting Structural Engineer
Maryland, USA

See my books at: www.multi-science.co.uk/subramanian-book.htm
www.oup.co.in/search_detail.php?id=144559





--- On Sun, 1/11/09, jatfuentes wrote:    
--auto removed--

Posted via Email
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gsparsan
Progressive Member
Progressive Member


Joined: 03 Aug 2008
Posts: 43

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 11:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is another problem that may need to be considered in my opinion.

Welding of the anchor bolt which is already cast in will heat the anchor bolt. There is a risk of debonding with the concrete. If washer plates (or anchor plates) are used to resist uplift, this is not a problem. But if the bonding between the bolt and the concrete is being relied upon, can this be a potential problem?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jatfuentes
...
...


Joined: 26 Jul 2008
Posts: 68

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 10:46 pm    Post subject: RES: Re: Welding Anchor Bolts Reply with quote

Dear Mr. gsparsan,
Yes ,the anchor bolts have a square plate stiffened at the embedment end in order to form a concrete cone.
Thanks for your advice
jatfuentes

De: gsparsan [mailto:forum@sefindia.org]
Enviada em: segunda-feira, 12 de janeiro de 2009 09:22
Para: general@sefindia.org
Assunto: [SEFI] Re: Welding Anchor Bolts



There is another problem that may need to be considered in my opinion.

Welding of the anchor bolt which is already cast in will heat the anchor bolt. There is a risk of debonding with the concrete. If washer plates (or anchor plates) are used to resist uplift, this is not a problem. But if the bonding between the bolt and the concrete is being relied upon, can this be a potential problem?

Posted via Email
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topicReply to topic Thank Post    www.sefindia.org Forum Index -> SEFI General Discussion All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2

 

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


© 2003, 2008 SEFINDIA, Indian Domain Registration
Publishing or acceptance of an advertisement is neither a guarantee nor endorsement of the advertiser's product or service. advertisement policy