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[Future of Str. Engg] FUTURE OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 7:16 am    Post subject: [Future of Str. Engg] FUTURE OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS Reply with quote

Dear Sefians,

Welcome to the e-conference.

I am listing below some of the crucial issues confronting Structural Engineers in India in respect of their roles, responsibilities and their position in the overall construction industry as well as in the society at large.

1. Our profession of structural engineering is becoming more and more commoditized as computers are doing more of our work. Young Engineers are becoming more and more computer operators and loosing grip on the fundamentals of structural concepts, structural behavior and flow of forces. Structural Engineers must focus in improving technical fundamentals. Blind reliance on computers can erode our ability to make reasoned judgments that involve common sense and intuition.

2. Increasingly, we are having trouble attracting and retaining the best and brightest to our profession. One of the reasons for this is our poor image in the society. How many Civil and Structural Engineers got national recognition for meaningful contribution to the society in the form of Padma awards till date ?  The answer is very discouraging. This is despite the fact that civil engineering is one of the oldest and most noble professions. Reasons for this poor image are many and certainly needs deliberation in this e-conference. If we want to attract bright and the best brains into structural engineering, we need to do anything and everything to fix our image first. We need to tell our success stories and we need to campaign for ourselves by using our strong electronic as well as print media.

3. The current world population is 7.4 billion, which is projected to reach 9 to 10 billion by the year 2050. India with current population of 1.29 billion is likely to overtake China as the world's most populous nation by 2022, with an estimated population of 1.45 billion (as per UN report). The massive population of India will need affordable, sustainable housing and infrastructure on an enormous scale. There is a lot of building and infrastructure to be built. This will require developing a new breed of structural engineers, more broadly capable than ever before more creative, collaborative, and communicative who should aim to become global leaders in society's grand challenges.

4. The global engineering work force is becoming leveled and will continue to be so in future. We already face stiff competition from multi-nationals who are gripping the Indian market, much of it high in quality. This trend will continue to grow in coming years. For us to compete, for getting jobs in our own country and overseas, we must become more competent technically, more mobile and more willing to improve our knowledge base. A globally flattened market means that engineers of the future will need breadth, both in technical skills and soft skills, to operate in many diverse locations and cultures. Perhaps most importantly, the structural engineers need to be adept at collaborating on teams with members scattered around the globe.

5. We are consuming the earth's irreplaceable resources at an unsustainable rate. Unless there are drastic steps taken towards a sustainable model of development, we will bankrupt our planet of these resources in short span of time. New breed of structural engineers need to have the skill and knowledge towards sustainable design models and ensure that a drastically more responsible approach is taken in development, balancing quality of life with natural resources. This is the area where focus is likely to be there in coming years.

6. Recent awareness of the impact of climate changes on natural hazards are causing us to question the efficacy of our criteria and approach for design against natural hazards, particularly earthquake, wind, flooding, cyclones, and sea level. This will drive us toward more flexible, performance-based approaches. It also requires that engineers take leadership roles in major policy questions in hazards management, or even in some cases advising societies on where to build and where not to build.

7. Presently there is a disconnect between the industry and the academia. The system is not entirely harmonized. Industry expects too much from the undergraduate curricula and does very little in on-job training to orient the young engineers. On the one hand, we espouse the virtues of a solid grounding in technical fundamentals and soft skills; on the other, we send recruiters to university job fairs and seek out practice-ready professionals with knowledge of the latest versions of codes and analysis software. This needs to be corrected.

8. In light of the above, what are the attributes expected from tomorrow's Structural Engineer?  Given below are my wish list :

a)        Tomorrow's engineer must be globally aware and adept. They should possess the ability to embrace different cultures, values, languages, and business practices.

b)        More than ever, tomorrow's Engineer must be aware that a career in engineering requires a commitment to life-long learning. Comprehensive gain of knowledge and skills will be an intensive, ongoing effort from engineering institution to the practice, until the engineer retires.

c)        Tomorrow's structural engineer will have to focus more to invent new construction materials and systems, as well as innovate new processes and innovative approaches to problems. Sustainability aspects in design needs to be well understood.

d)        Tomorrow's engineer must be able to engage in lateral, functional thinking as well as vertical, in-depth thinking; to synthesize as well as analyze; to integrate knowledge from a variety of sources; to integrate complex systems. To do this, they must be able to span disciplinary boundaries.

May be the issues could serve as the starting points for initiating dialogue and for encouraging my fellow sefians to give their valuable comments and suggestions.

I wish every success to this initiative of SEFI-Admin and to all the Sefians who will join us in this endeavour. Let us together make this e-conference a unique experience by actively participating, by sharing our experience, our thoughts and our views.

Jai Hind !

Alok Bhowmick
Managing Director, B&S Engineering Consultants Pvt. Ltd.,
Chairman, Editorial Board, ING-IABSE,
Vice President, ING-IABSE,
Member, Governing Council, IASE, CEAI,
Member Secretary, B1 Committee (IRC),
Member, BSS, B2, B4, B5, B6, B9 & B10 Committee (IRC)

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2016 11:00 am    Post subject: [Future of Str. Engg] FUTURE OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS Reply with quote

Hello to all
Nobody even knows the name of any Structural Engineer who designs the building or any Structure, also the Structural engineer doesn't get enough resources to sustain oneself.
But the entire responsibility of the structure is on the head of Structural Engineer.
Hence only pain no gain or glamour or recognition , is the reason for bleak future for Structural Engineers.  On 08-Feb-2016 12:54 PM, "bsec" <forum@sefindia.org (forum@sefindia.org)> wrote:
Quote:
           Dear Sefians,

Welcome to the e-conference.

I am listing below some of the crucial issues confronting Structural Engineers in India in respect of their roles, responsibilities and their position in the overall construction industry as well as in the society at large.

1. Our profession of structural engineering is becoming more and more commoditized as computers are doing more of our work. Young Engineers are becoming more and more computer operators and loosing grip on the fundamentals of structural concepts, structural behavior and flow of forces. Structural Engineers must focus in improving technical fundamentals. Blind reliance on computers can erode our ability to make reasoned judgments that involve common sense and intuition.

2. Increasingly, we are having trouble attracting and retaining the best and brightest to our profession. One of the reasons for this is our poor image in the society. How many Civil and Structural Engineers got national recognition for meaningful contribution to the society in the form of Padma awards till date ? The answer is very discouraging. This is despite the fact that civil engineering is one of the oldest and most noble professions. Reasons for this poor image are many and certainly needs deliberation in this e-conference. If we want to attract bright and the best brains into structural engineering, we need to do anything and everything to fix our image first. We need to tell our success stories and we need to campaign for ourselves by using our strong electronic as well as print media.

3. The current world population is 7.4 billion, which is projected to reach 9 to 10 billion by the year 2050. India with current population of 1.29 billion is likely to overtake China as the world's most populous nation by 2022, with an estimated population of 1.45 billion (as per UN report). The massive population of India will need affordable, sustainable housing and infrastructure on an enormous scale. There is a lot of building and infrastructure to be built. This will require developing a new breed of structural engineers, more broadly capable than ever before  more creative, collaborative, and communicative  who should aim to become global leaders in society's grand challenges.

4. The global engineering work force is becoming leveled and will continue to be so in future. We already face stiff competition from multi-nationals who are gripping the Indian market, much of it high in quality. This trend will continue to grow in coming years. For us to compete, for getting jobs in our own country and overseas, we must become more competent technically, more mobile and more willing to improve our knowledge base. A globally flattened market means that engineers of the future will need breadth, both in technical skills and soft skills, to operate in many diverse locations and cultures. Perhaps most importantly, the structural engineers need to be adept at collaborating on teams with members scattered around the globe.

5. We are consuming the earth's irreplaceable resources at an unsustainable rate. Unless there are drastic steps taken towards a sustainable model of development, we will bankrupt our planet of these resources in short span of time. New breed of structural engineers need to have the skill and knowledge towards sustainable design models and ensure that a drastically more responsible approach is taken in development, balancing quality of life with natural resources. This is the area where focus is likely to be there in coming years.

6. Recent awareness of the impact of climate changes on natural hazards are causing us to question the efficacy of our criteria and approach for design against natural hazards, particularly earthquake, wind, flooding, cyclones, and sea level. This will drive us toward more flexible, performance-based approaches. It also requires that engineers take leadership roles in major policy questions in hazards management, or even in some cases advising societies on where to build and where not to build.

7. Presently there is a disconnect between the industry and the academia. The system is not entirely harmonized. Industry expects too much from the undergraduate curricula and does very little in on-job training to orient the young engineers. On the one hand, we espouse the virtues of a solid grounding in technical fundamentals and soft skills; on the other, we send recruiters to university job fairs and seek out practice-ready professionals with knowledge of the latest versions of codes and analysis software. This needs to be corrected.

8. In light of the above, what are the attributes expected from tomorrow's Structural Engineer? Given below are my wish list :

a) Tomorrow's engineer must be globally aware and adept. They should possess the ability to embrace different cultures, values, languages, and business practices.

b) More than ever, tomorrow's Engineer must be aware that a career in engineering requires a commitment to life-long learning. Comprehensive gain of knowledge and skills will be an intensive, ongoing effort from engineering institution to the practice, until the engineer retires.

c) Tomorrow's structural engineer will have to focus more to invent new construction materials and systems, as well as innovate new processes and innovative approaches to problems. Sustainability aspects in design needs to be well understood.

d) Tomorrow's engineer must be able to engage in lateral, functional thinking as well as vertical, in-depth thinking; to synthesize as well as analyze; to integrate knowledge from a variety of sources; to integrate complex systems. To do this, they must be able to span disciplinary boundaries.

May be the issues could serve as the starting points for initiating dialogue and for encouraging my fellow sefians to give their valuable comments and suggestions.

I wish every success to this initiative of SEFI-Admin and to all the Sefians who will join us in this endeavour. Let us together make this e-conference a unique experience by actively participating, by sharing our experience, our thoughts and our views.

Jai Hind !

Alok Bhowmick
Managing Director, B&S Engineering Consultants Pvt. Ltd.,
Chairman, Editorial Board, ING-IABSE,
Vice President, ING-IABSE,
Member, Governing Council, IASE, CEAI,
Member Secretary, B1 Committee (IRC),
Member, BSS, B2, B4, B5, B6, B9 & B10 Committee (IRC)
     



     



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PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2016 1:00 am    Post subject: [Future of Str. Engg] FUTURE OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS Reply with quote

Whether one likes it or not, "the old order changeth yielding place to new"The analysis and design will be APP based only in future
We will need knowledge of engineering only for those who are supposed to certify the correctness of design. Definitely, a knowledge of engineering would be needed by those managing the translation of design into actual structures in the field.
We import the software. It may be a good idea to train how to write the software and know theory of structural/foundation engineering.


ARC




On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 12:50 PM, bsec <forum@sefindia.org (forum@sefindia.org)> wrote:
Quote:
           Dear Sefians,

Welcome to the e-conference.

I am listing below some of the crucial issues confronting Structural Engineers in India in respect of their roles, responsibilities and their position in the overall construction industry as well as in the society at large.

1. Our profession of structural engineering is becoming more and more commoditized as computers are doing more of our work. Young Engineers are becoming more and more computer operators and loosing grip on the fundamentals of structural concepts, structural behavior and flow of forces. Structural Engineers must focus in improving technical fundamentals. Blind reliance on computers can erode our ability to make reasoned judgments that involve common sense and intuition.

2. Increasingly, we are having trouble attracting and retaining the best and brightest to our profession. One of the reasons for this is our poor image in the society. How many Civil and Structural Engineers got national recognition for meaningful contribution to the society in the form of Padma awards till date ? The answer is very discouraging. This is despite the fact that civil engineering is one of the oldest and most noble professions. Reasons for this poor image are many and certainly needs deliberation in this e-conference. If we want to attract bright and the best brains into structural engineering, we need to do anything and everything to fix our image first. We need to tell our success stories and we need to campaign for ourselves by using our strong electronic as well as print media.

3. The current world population is 7.4 billion, which is projected to reach 9 to 10 billion by the year 2050. India with current population of 1.29 billion is likely to overtake China as the world's most populous nation by 2022, with an estimated population of 1.45 billion (as per UN report). The massive population of India will need affordable, sustainable housing and infrastructure on an enormous scale. There is a lot of building and infrastructure to be built. This will require developing a new breed of structural engineers, more broadly capable than ever before  more creative, collaborative, and communicative  who should aim to become global leaders in society's grand challenges.

4. The global engineering work force is becoming leveled and will continue to be so in future. We already face stiff competition from multi-nationals who are gripping the Indian market, much of it high in quality. This trend will continue to grow in coming years. For us to compete, for getting jobs in our own country and overseas, we must become more competent technically, more mobile and more willing to improve our knowledge base. A globally flattened market means that engineers of the future will need breadth, both in technical skills and soft skills, to operate in many diverse locations and cultures. Perhaps most importantly, the structural engineers need to be adept at collaborating on teams with members scattered around the globe.

5. We are consuming the earth's irreplaceable resources at an unsustainable rate. Unless there are drastic steps taken towards a sustainable model of development, we will bankrupt our planet of these resources in short span of time. New breed of structural engineers need to have the skill and knowledge towards sustainable design models and ensure that a drastically more responsible approach is taken in development, balancing quality of life with natural resources. This is the area where focus is likely to be there in coming years.

6. Recent awareness of the impact of climate changes on natural hazards are causing us to question the efficacy of our criteria and approach for design against natural hazards, particularly earthquake, wind, flooding, cyclones, and sea level. This will drive us toward more flexible, performance-based approaches. It also requires that engineers take leadership roles in major policy questions in hazards management, or even in some cases advising societies on where to build and where not to build.

7. Presently there is a disconnect between the industry and the academia. The system is not entirely harmonized. Industry expects too much from the undergraduate curricula and does very little in on-job training to orient the young engineers. On the one hand, we espouse the virtues of a solid grounding in technical fundamentals and soft skills; on the other, we send recruiters to university job fairs and seek out practice-ready professionals with knowledge of the latest versions of codes and analysis software. This needs to be corrected.

8. In light of the above, what are the attributes expected from tomorrow's Structural Engineer? Given below are my wish list :

a) Tomorrow's engineer must be globally aware and adept. They should possess the ability to embrace different cultures, values, languages, and business practices.

b) More than ever, tomorrow's Engineer must be aware that a career in engineering requires a commitment to life-long learning. Comprehensive gain of knowledge and skills will be an intensive, ongoing effort from engineering institution to the practice, until the engineer retires.

c) Tomorrow's structural engineer will have to focus more to invent new construction materials and systems, as well as innovate new processes and innovative approaches to problems. Sustainability aspects in design needs to be well understood.

d) Tomorrow's engineer must be able to engage in lateral, functional thinking as well as vertical, in-depth thinking; to synthesize as well as analyze; to integrate knowledge from a variety of sources; to integrate complex systems. To do this, they must be able to span disciplinary boundaries.

May be the issues could serve as the starting points for initiating dialogue and for encouraging my fellow sefians to give their valuable comments and suggestions.

I wish every success to this initiative of SEFI-Admin and to all the Sefians who will join us in this endeavour. Let us together make this e-conference a unique experience by actively participating, by sharing our experience, our thoughts and our views.

Jai Hind !

Alok Bhowmick
Managing Director, B&S Engineering Consultants Pvt. Ltd.,
Chairman, Editorial Board, ING-IABSE,
Vice President, ING-IABSE,
Member, Governing Council, IASE, CEAI,
Member Secretary, B1 Committee (IRC),
Member, BSS, B2, B4, B5, B6, B9 & B10 Committee (IRC)
     



     



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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I feel, BIM (Building Information Management) will grow further, analytical modelling or structural idealisation  will be much easier,  designs will be generated automatically of which it will be made ready for 3D printing....That time role structural engineers is to monitor the process.
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 6:44 am    Post subject: [Future of Str. Engg] FUTURE OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS Reply with quote

Dear All,

Exactly one week has passed since this e-conference begun and it is time to take stock and to do a recap of what has been discussed so far and what is left in this sub-topic of “Future of Structural Engineer”.  

Mr R J M Prasad is disheartened by the fact that structural engineer, despite taking all the responsibilities, is lowly paid and do not get any recognition. The SE is only in ‘pain without gain’ according to him.

A Senior and Active Member of SEFI, Prof A R C opined that one must accept the fact that the in future, structural analysis and design will be software based. Knowledge of Engineering will be required only for those who certify the designs and drawings and those who translates these designs to reality (i,e. The Constructor). He emphasized that in future, structural engineers training should be more oriented towards writing software to know theory of structural and foundation engineering.  

Mr S I Zubair opined that we structural engineers need to show leadership. Self help, according to him, is the best way to find our own recognition.We structural engineers need to uplift ourselves with self-initiating and self-serving programs to get recognition and fees that commensurate with our effort and responsibility

I would like to appeal all the participants of the e-conference to stay focussed and share your thought, ‘more’ about how to improve this situation in future. Ultimate aim of this e-conference is to form strategy for future. While demonstration of emotion is useful, but cool thinking has no substitution. So let us think cool and spend more time in deciding what is to be done to improve the situation in future. Let us share our thoughts on :

a) What should be change in Civil Engineering curriculum, in the universities so as to orient the Engineers who come out of the college in the right direction?  

b) How to improve the connectivity between industry and academia? How the industry should treat fresh engineers who come out of college, so that they are on track in the field of structural engineering.

c) How to inculcate this sense of commitment from the engineering profession, and, by proxy, the individual engineers who belong to the profession, to place the public safety and interest ahead of all other considerations and obligations. There has to be some code of ethics, which we structural engineers should follow in our day to day working.

d) How to improve our overall image and visibility in the society by connecting ourselves as a group and working together, particularly when society needs us (Say in case of any disaster).  

Hope to have more discussions covering these issues in this week.

Best Wishes

Alok Bhowmick

On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 12:50 PM, bsec <forum@sefindia.org (forum@sefindia.org)> wrote:
Quote:
           Dear Sefians,

Welcome to the e-conference.

I am listing below some of the crucial issues confronting Structural Engineers in India in respect of their roles, responsibilities and their position in the overall construction industry as well as in the society at large.

1. Our profession of structural engineering is becoming more and more commoditized as computers are doing more of our work. Young Engineers are becoming more and more computer operators and loosing grip on the fundamentals of structural concepts, structural behavior and flow of forces. Structural Engineers must focus in improving technical fundamentals. Blind reliance on computers can erode our ability to make reasoned judgments that involve common sense and intuition.

2. Increasingly, we are having trouble attracting and retaining the best and brightest to our profession. One of the reasons for this is our poor image in the society. How many Civil and Structural Engineers got national recognition for meaningful contribution to the society in the form of Padma awards till date ? The answer is very discouraging. This is despite the fact that civil engineering is one of the oldest and most noble professions. Reasons for this poor image are many and certainly needs deliberation in this e-conference. If we want to attract bright and the best brains into structural engineering, we need to do anything and everything to fix our image first. We need to tell our success stories and we need to campaign for ourselves by using our strong electronic as well as print media.

3. The current world population is 7.4 billion, which is projected to reach 9 to 10 billion by the year 2050. India with current population of 1.29 billion is likely to overtake China as the world's most populous nation by 2022, with an estimated population of 1.45 billion (as per UN report). The massive population of India will need affordable, sustainable housing and infrastructure on an enormous scale. There is a lot of building and infrastructure to be built. This will require developing a new breed of structural engineers, more broadly capable than ever before  more creative, collaborative, and communicative  who should aim to become global leaders in society's grand challenges.

4. The global engineering work force is becoming leveled and will continue to be so in future. We already face stiff competition from multi-nationals who are gripping the Indian market, much of it high in quality. This trend will continue to grow in coming years. For us to compete, for getting jobs in our own country and overseas, we must become more competent technically, more mobile and more willing to improve our knowledge base. A globally flattened market means that engineers of the future will need breadth, both in technical skills and soft skills, to operate in many diverse locations and cultures. Perhaps most importantly, the structural engineers need to be adept at collaborating on teams with members scattered around the globe.

5. We are consuming the earth's irreplaceable resources at an unsustainable rate. Unless there are drastic steps taken towards a sustainable model of development, we will bankrupt our planet of these resources in short span of time. New breed of structural engineers need to have the skill and knowledge towards sustainable design models and ensure that a drastically more responsible approach is taken in development, balancing quality of life with natural resources. This is the area where focus is likely to be there in coming years.

6. Recent awareness of the impact of climate changes on natural hazards are causing us to question the efficacy of our criteria and approach for design against natural hazards, particularly earthquake, wind, flooding, cyclones, and sea level. This will drive us toward more flexible, performance-based approaches. It also requires that engineers take leadership roles in major policy questions in hazards management, or even in some cases advising societies on where to build and where not to build.

7. Presently there is a disconnect between the industry and the academia. The system is not entirely harmonized. Industry expects too much from the undergraduate curricula and does very little in on-job training to orient the young engineers. On the one hand, we espouse the virtues of a solid grounding in technical fundamentals and soft skills; on the other, we send recruiters to university job fairs and seek out practice-ready professionals with knowledge of the latest versions of codes and analysis software. This needs to be corrected.

8. In light of the above, what are the attributes expected from tomorrow's Structural Engineer? Given below are my wish list :

a) Tomorrow's engineer must be globally aware and adept. They should possess the ability to embrace different cultures, values, languages, and business practices.

b) More than ever, tomorrow's Engineer must be aware that a career in engineering requires a commitment to life-long learning. Comprehensive gain of knowledge and skills will be an intensive, ongoing effort from engineering institution to the practice, until the engineer retires.

c) Tomorrow's structural engineer will have to focus more to invent new construction materials and systems, as well as innovate new processes and innovative approaches to problems. Sustainability aspects in design needs to be well understood.

d) Tomorrow's engineer must be able to engage in lateral, functional thinking as well as vertical, in-depth thinking; to synthesize as well as analyze; to integrate knowledge from a variety of sources; to integrate complex systems. To do this, they must be able to span disciplinary boundaries.

May be the issues could serve as the starting points for initiating dialogue and for encouraging my fellow sefians to give their valuable comments and suggestions.

I wish every success to this initiative of SEFI-Admin and to all the Sefians who will join us in this endeavour. Let us together make this e-conference a unique experience by actively participating, by sharing our experience, our thoughts and our views.

Jai Hind !

Alok Bhowmick
Managing Director, B&S Engineering Consultants Pvt. Ltd.,
Chairman, Editorial Board, ING-IABSE,
Vice President, ING-IABSE,
Member, Governing Council, IASE, CEAI,
Member Secretary, B1 Committee (IRC),
Member, BSS, B2, B4, B5, B6, B9 & B10 Committee (IRC)
     



     



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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 8:00 am    Post subject: [Future of Str. Engg] FUTURE OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS Reply with quote

Dear All

I think core courses like Strength of Material, Two analysis courses and two design courses (one in RC and one in Steel) are taught in most of the places. Further, elective courses like Structural Dynamics, Earthquake Engng., Finite Element methods, Prestressed concrete are also taught in many places. These are good enough to provide sound fundamentals to students to become a good structural engineer. However, to address your point no. 2, we need to send students to design houses as summer interns, give UG/ PG projects based on some interesting field problems. This will develop good coordination between academic institutions and design houses. However, sincere participation of people from both the groups are important. Students often complain that they are never taken seriously when they actually go for summer internship to industry and hence we have to be a little more proactive in generating interests in the minds of those young students. I believe that we can collectively bring about changes in the areas of concern.


With best wishes,
Anjan Dutta
Prof., Civil Engng. Deptt, IIT Guwahati
Phone: 0361-2582405 (o); 0361-2584405(R)
FAX : 0361-2582440
Mobile: 9435047443
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 8:00 am    Post subject: [Future of Str. Engg] FUTURE OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS Reply with quote

Sir, after reading each and every mail for this one week, suggestions from every person related to structural engineering around the globe.
They made some good points but sir as we are concerned with improving the quality of a fresh graduate from structural engineer I don't see any efforts out in the industry for that.
As I am a fresh graduate and hunting for job I have come acrossed number of such situations. They initially ask for a experience of around 2 years. How can a fresh graduate bring a experience of 2 years. So for the sake of getting job these fresh guys start showing fake experience and this is how the start for degradation of that structural engineer begins.
Even if he gets selected on basis of that fake experience, he is straight away given vast and big projects no senior engineer is least worried of sharing thoughts or checking him.
In the run to complete the task he starts using softwares blindly and completes the task.
Owners are least worried about it as they are just looking for their money and completion of task.
But the senior engineers around are also least worried about it as they are busy in their task which from their point is not wrong.
The thing which I want to say is that how can these senior guys or big companies ask for 1-2 year experience from fresh graduate.
No one wants to go for freshers and train them and make them aware of practical scenarios.
I am well aware of current this situation as due to work load and hectic schedule no one wants to do this training thing. if this same situation continues there's going to be no chance of improving this situation as freshers are going to come up with fake experience use the software blindly to get the job done quickly by referring some Internet videos and such things.
I am going through all this thing and learning from all as I can keep patience until I get a job as fresher, but what about those who needs a job urgently they sure will get in bluffing the companies by giving fake experience and start dropping the structural values and ethics. They don't even want to go deep in any projects as because of work load and to get the job done.
Some companies are hiring some freshers but that's not enough from global point of view.
Experienced engineers from this forum should go on preparing some site of their own online and share their experience through videos which will surely do some effort in this direction.
But I am still looking for a job and I am a ""fresher"" if anyone needs me I am completely ready and enthusiastic to work and go on and become a good structural engineer.
Hope I added few points.
Regards to all. On 10 Feb 2016 05:03, "prof.arc" <forum@sefindia.org (forum@sefindia.org)> wrote:[quote]            Whether one likes it or not, "the old order changeth yielding place to new"The analysis and design will be APP based only in future
We will need knowledge of engineering only for those who are supposed to certify the correctness of design. Definitely, a knowledge of engineering would be needed by those managing the translation of design into actual structures in the field.
We import the software. It may be a good idea to train how to write the software and know theory of structural/foundation engineering.


ARC




On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 12:50 PM, bsec forum@sefindia.org (forum@sefindia.org))> wrote:
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 10:00 am    Post subject: [Future of Str. Engg] FUTURE OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS Reply with quote

Dear All,


I Prof. B V Ramesh, currently working at PES University, Bangalore. I have around 18 years of Industrial experience and into teaching for the last 5 years.


I agree with the view of the learned members of the group, regarding the quality of the Engineering graduates being churned out from the colleges. This could be because of the following issues.


1. Basic subjects could be taught by anyone who has little experience. But design subjects like Design of RCC Structures, Steel structures, Pres Stressed Concrete, Design drawing RCC and Steel, it is better if someone who has taught 3 or 4 times teaches it or still better if an industry expert teaches or at least once or twice in a semester spends one or 2 hours sharing his experience.


2. Most of the faculty in Civil Engineering colleges are young, just of out of Masters or may be has 2 or 3 years of teaching experience. But there are few faculty in the college who have taught the subjects and have design experience.


There is a wide gap between the Academics and Industry. This gap needs to be bridged.. The efforts should be from both the Universities / colleges and the Industrial experts.
The quality / knowledge of the Engineering Graduates coming out of the college could improve if the Industry can help in bridging the gap.


I. I request all the industry experts in their respective fields to please have a tie up with the Engineering colleges close to their work place. Sir i know that the faculty at the college should do this. But.. most of the faculty are also young and inexperienced.
This will be a win win situation for all.
The student gets trained by the industry experts while perusing his/ her studies.

The Industry gets good staff for their office.

The college gets a good name for providing a platform for the students to get practical experience from the industry experts.


II. Offer internship to the students. So that the student gets to know what is happening in the market and what the industry requires. The students get hands on experience and this is again going to help the industry in getting a better staff. Tons and tons of theory is not equal to an ounce of practical.


III. Industrial visits to be organized by the colleges.



These are few of the things, i request my other members are to contribute further points. This helps all of us in taking corrective steps.



Regards


Prof. B V Ramesh

PES University

Bangalore

9341213546









On Mon, Feb 15, 2016 at 12:15 PM, bsec <forum@sefindia.org (forum@sefindia.org)> wrote:
[quote]            Dear All,

Exactly one week has passed since this e-conference begun and it is time to take stock and to do a recap of what has been discussed so far and what is left in this sub-topic of “Future of Structural Engineer†.

Mr R J M Prasad is disheartened by the fact that structural engineer, despite taking all the responsibilities, is lowly paid and do not get any recognition. The SE is only in ‘pain without gain’ according to him.

A Senior and Active Member of SEFI, Prof A R C opined that one must accept the fact that the in future, structural analysis and design will be software based. Knowledge of Engineering will be required only for those who certify the designs and drawings and those who translates these designs to reality (i,e. The Constructor). He emphasized that in future, structural engineers training should be more oriented towards writing software to know theory of structural and foundation engineering.

Mr S I Zubair opined that we structural engineers need to show leadership. Self help, according to him, is the best way to find our own recognition.We structural engineers need to uplift ourselves with self-initiating and self-serving programs to get recognition and fees that commensurate with our effort and responsibility

I would like to appeal all the participants of the e-conference to stay focussed and share your thought, ‘more’ about how to improve this situation in future. Ultimate aim of this e-conference is to form strategy for future. While demonstration of emotion is useful, but cool thinking has no substitution. So let us think cool and spend more time in deciding what is to be done to improve the situation in future. Let us share our thoughts on :

a) What should be change in Civil Engineering curriculum, in the universities so as to orient the Engineers who come out of the college in the right direction?

b) How to improve the connectivity between industry and academia? How the industry should treat fresh engineers who come out of college, so that they are on track in the field of structural engineering.

c) How to inculcate this sense of commitment from the engineering profession, and, by proxy, the individual engineers who belong to the profession, to place the public safety and interest ahead of all other considerations and obligations. There has to be some code of ethics, which we structural engineers should follow in our day to day working.

d) How to improve our overall image and visibility in the society by connecting ourselves as a group and working together, particularly when society needs us (Say in case of any disaster).

Hope to have more discussions covering these issues in this week.

Best Wishes

Alok Bhowmick

On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 12:50 PM, bsec forum@sefindia.org (forum@sefindia.org))> wrote:
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 3:36 pm    Post subject: [Future of Str. Engg] FUTURE OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS Reply with quote

May be you are aware that Association of Consulting Civil Engineers (India) has been conducting Student Mentoring Program for last five years, where members and non members are devoting time to mentor students at all India level. It is time Institution and colleges interact with the professional bodies such as ACCE(I), if they wish to harness benefit to students and staff equally well.
Regards Umesh Rao


On 15 February 2016 at 20:38, ramesh67 <forum@sefindia.org (forum@sefindia.org)> wrote:
[quote]            Dear All,


I Prof. B V Ramesh, currently working at PES University, Bangalore. I have around 18 years of Industrial experience and into teaching for the last 5 years.


I agree with the view of the learned members of the group, regarding the quality of the Engineering graduates being churned out from the colleges. This could be because of the following issues.


1. Basic subjects could be taught by anyone who has little experience. But design subjects like Design of RCC Structures, Steel structures, Pres Stressed Concrete, Design drawing RCC and Steel, it is better if someone who has taught 3 or 4 times teaches it or still better if an industry expert teaches or at least once or twice in a semester spends one or 2 hours sharing his experience.


2. Most of the faculty in Civil Engineering colleges are young, just of out of Masters or may be has 2 or 3 years of teaching experience. But there are few faculty in the college who have taught the subjects and have design experience.


There is a wide gap between the Academics and Industry. This gap needs to be bridged.. The efforts should be from both the Universities / colleges and the Industrial experts.
The quality / knowledge of the Engineering Graduates coming out of the college could improve if the Industry can help in bridging the gap.


I. I request all the industry experts in their respective fields to please have a tie up with the Engineering colleges close to their work place. Sir i know that the faculty at the college should do this. But.. most of the faculty are also young and inexperienced.
This will be a win win situation for all.
The student gets trained by the industry experts while perusing his/ her studies.

The Industry gets good staff for their office.

The college gets a good name for providing a platform for the students to get practical experience from the industry experts.


II. Offer internship to the students. So that the student gets to know what is happening in the market and what the industry requires. The students get hands on experience and this is again going to help the industry in getting a better staff. Tons and tons of theory is not equal to an ounce of practical.


III. Industrial visits to be organized by the colleges.



These are few of the things, i request my other members are to contribute further points. This helps all of us in taking corrective steps.



Regards


Prof. B V Ramesh

PES University

Bangalore

9341213546









On Mon, Feb 15, 2016 at 12:15 PM, bsec forum@sefindia.org (forum@sefindia.org))> wrote:
Quote:
           Dear All,

Exactly one week has passed since this e-conference begun and it is time to take stock and to do a recap of what has been discussed so far and what is left in this sub-topic of Ãâ‚Å“Future of Structural EngineerÃâ‚ .

Mr R J M Prasad is disheartened by the fact that structural engineer, despite taking all the responsibilities, is lowly paid and do not get any recognition. The SE is only in Ãâ‚Ëœpain without gainÃâ‚â„ according to him.

A Senior and Active Member of SEFI, Prof A R C opined that one must accept the fact that the in future, structural analysis and design will be software based. Knowledge of Engineering will be required only for those who certify the designs and drawings and those who translates these designs to reality (i,e. The Constructor). He emphasized that in future, structural engineers training should be more oriented towards writing software to know theory of structural and foundation engineering.

Mr S I Zubair opined that we structural engineers need to show leadership. Self help, according to him, is the best way to find our own recognition.We structural engineers need to uplift ourselves with self-initiating and self-serving programs to get recognition and fees that commensurate with our effort and responsibility

I would like to appeal all the participants of the e-conference to stay focussed and share your thought, Ãâ‚ËœmoreÃâ‚â„ about how to improve this situation in future. Ultimate aim of this e-conference is to form strategy for future. While demonstration of emotion is useful, but cool thinking has no substitution. So let us think cool and spend more time in deciding what is to be done to improve the situation in future. Let us share our thoughts on :

a) What should be change in Civil Engineering curriculum, in the universities so as to orient the Engineers who come out of the college in the right direction?

b) How to improve the connectivity between industry and academia? How the industry should treat fresh engineers who come out of college, so that they are on track in the field of structural engineering.

c) How to inculcate this sense of commitment from the engineering profession, and, by proxy, the individual engineers who belong to the profession, to place the public safety and interest ahead of all other considerations and obligations. There has to be some code of ethics, which we structural engineers should follow in our day to day working.

d) How to improve our overall image and visibility in the society by connecting ourselves as a group and working together, particularly when society needs us (Say in case of any disaster).

Hope to have more discussions covering these issues in this week.

Best Wishes

Alok Bhowmick

On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 12:50 PM, bsec forum@sefindia.org (forum@sefindia.org) (forum@sefindia.org (forum@sefindia.org)))> wrote:
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2016 3:00 am    Post subject: [Future of Str. Engg] FUTURE OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS Reply with quote

dear sir, Ego of faculty member that i have been teaching since last 20 years this subject,so i don't need to  learn any more.i am the master of this subject.once i went to an IIT(NAME WITH HELD INTENTIONALLY)and  requested that you kindly send post graduate and final year year students to visit our site,which is  hardly six kilometer to learn how kerb for well foundation is being assembled i.e steel plates are  being welded.also steel piles are being driven in this deep canal to make way for vibratory(heavy duty  electric vibrator)crane imported from Sweden.how the heavy kerb is transferred for a sand  filled(enclosed) area.He did not show any interest.why did i go to see him.one of PG Pass out student  from same IIT was working on this project,he told me such things are not taught.One has to learn,when  opportunities are coming. if you see any advertisement for any senior position,it is written post graduate,Phd holders need not  apply.Engineering is half theory and half practice.Exposure to latest technology is must.we have no  practical exposure to design concrete mix above 80n/mm2.At one international site of construction,four  slabs of runway were 3 mm to 5 mm were out of tolerance.one Indian U.N EXPERT told me i am going to  reject them.i told me not to write such letter,instead write how will you correct them.The German  company produced an epoxy concrete mix and with special technique laid over the slab.After 48 hours  asked that what ever test you know,we will prove that slab is perfect and strong enough for its life  time.Abrasion tests by passing 100 tonne trailer were passed over the area several times,but nothing  happened.Company chief Engineer said you will take another fifty years to learn engineering.it is true. Indian author,s Books are out dated.American Prints are out of reach to Indian students.Only books by  Dr. subramanian are up to the mark. Let all of us agree that no one learns from the womb of the mother.Good institutes and R&D can pave the  way for learning. Good dedicated teachers,well paid and experienced of project execution shall join the teaching  profession. society leaders have to change the mindset of the people to go for good quality products and  services.good engineering products are being launched every day.it is a good sign.very good quality  building designs are being implemented.Structural engineers are playing key roles in designing of such  structures. regarding fee paid to structural engineers,we have to convince the employer.lowest rate quoted by  consulting firm is awarded the contract by govt. of India irrespective of the design and  supervision.unless some leader from engineering faculty holds key position in govt. of India or has say  in govt.,nothing is going to happen.At least a regulator shall be appointed.This shall be our approach. warm regards satya paul  On Tue, 16 Feb 2016 00:50:51 +0530 "ramesh67"  wrote >                   Dear All, >  >  > I Prof. B V Ramesh, currently working at PES University, Bangalore. I have around 18 years of  Industrial experience and into teaching for the last 5 years. >  >  > I agree with the view of the learned members of the group, regarding the quality of the Engineering  graduates being churned out from the colleges. This could be because of the following issues. >  >  > 1. Basic subjects could be taught by anyone who has little experience. But design subjects like  Design of RCC Structures, Steel structures, Pres Stressed Concrete, Design drawing RCC and Steel, it is  better if someone who has taught 3 or 4 times teaches it or still better if an industry expert  teaches or at least once or twice in a semester spends one or 2 hours sharing his experience. >  >  > 2. Most of the faculty in Civil Engineering colleges are young, just of out of Masters or may be has 2  or 3 years of teaching experience. But there are few faculty in the college who have taught the  subjects and have design experience.  >  >  > There is a wide gap between the Academics and Industry. This gap needs to be bridged.. The efforts  should be from both the Universities / colleges and the Industrial experts.  > The quality / knowledge of the Engineering Graduates coming out of the college could improve if the  Industry can help in bridging the gap. >  >  > I. I request all the industry experts in their respective fields to please have a tie up with the  Engineering colleges close to their work place. Sir i know that the faculty at the college should do  this. But.. most of the faculty are also young and inexperienced.   > This will be a win win situation for all.  > The student gets trained by the industry experts while perusing his/ her studies. >  > The Industry gets good staff for their office. >  > The college gets a good name for providing a platform for the students to get practical experience from  the industry experts. >  >  > II. Offer internship to the students. So that the student gets to know what is happening in the market  and what the industry requires. The students get hands on experience and this is again going to help  the industry in getting a better staff. Tons and tons of theory is not equal to an ounce of practical. >  >  > III. Industrial visits to be organized by the colleges.  >  >  >  > These are few of the things, i request my other members are to contribute further points. This helps  all of us in taking corrective steps. >  >  >  > Regards >  >  > Prof. B V Ramesh >  > PES University >  > Bangalore >  > 9341213546 >  >  >  >  >  >  >  >  >  > On Mon, Feb 15, 2016 at 12:15 PM, bsec wrote: > [quote]            Dear All,  >   > Exactly one week has passed since this e-conference begun and it is time to take stock and to do a  recap of what has been discussed so far and what is left in this sub-topic of Ãâ‚Å“Future of  Structural EngineerÃâ‚ .  >   > Mr R J M Prasad is disheartened by the fact that structural engineer, despite taking all the  responsibilities, is lowly paid and do not get any recognition. The SE is only in Ãâ‚Ëœpain without  gainÃâ‚â„ according to him.  >   > A Senior and Active Member of SEFI, Prof A R C opined that one must accept the fact that the in future,  structural analysis and design will be software based. Knowledge of Engineering will be required only  for those who certify the designs and drawings and those who translates these designs to reality (i,e.  The Constructor). He emphasized that in future, structural engineers training should be more oriented  towards writing software to know theory of structural and foundation engineering.  >   > Mr S I Zubair opined that we structural engineers need to show leadership. Self help, according to him,  is the best way to find our own recognition.We structural engineers need to uplift ourselves with  self-initiating and self-serving programs to get recognition and fees that commensurate with our effort  and responsibility  >   > I would like to appeal all the participants of the e-conference to stay focussed and share your  thought, Ãâ‚ËœmoreÃâ‚â„ about how to improve this situation in future. Ultimate aim of this e- conference is to form strategy for future. While demonstration of emotion is useful, but cool thinking  has no substitution. So let us think cool and spend more time in deciding what is to be done to improve  the situation in future. Let us share our thoughts on :  >   > a) What should be change in Civil Engineering curriculum, in the universities so as to orient the  Engineers who come out of the college in the right direction?  >   > b) How to improve the connectivity between industry and academia? How the industry should treat  fresh engineers who come out of college, so that they are on track in the field of structural  engineering.  >   > c) How to inculcate this sense of commitment from the engineering profession, and, by proxy, the  individual engineers who belong to the profession, to place the public safety and interest ahead of all  other considerations and obligations. There has to be some code of ethics, which we structural  engineers should follow in our day to day working.  >   > d) How to improve our overall image and visibility in the society by connecting ourselves as a group  and working together, particularly when society needs us (Say in case of any disaster).  >   > Hope to have more discussions covering these issues in this week.  >   > Best Wishes  >   > Alok Bhowmick >  > On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 12:50 PM, bsec forum@sefindia.org (forum@sefindia.org))> wrote: >       --auto removed-- >       > >  >  > --

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